Shocking image shows a Preston duck with a baby's dummy in its mouth

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A duck at Haslam Park in Preston has been pictured looking rather unusual - swimming in the pond nursing a baby's dummy!

Pictures shared to social media by a retired man from Ingol show the shocking moment he came across a mallard duck with a plastic dummy in its mouth.

Andrew Badley, an amateur photographer, was taking a walk on Wednesday, January 10 in Haslam Park when he came across the strange sight in the pond and captured it for others to see.

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A mallard duck at Haslam Park with a dummy in its mouth. Credit: Andrew BadleyA mallard duck at Haslam Park with a dummy in its mouth. Credit: Andrew Badley
A mallard duck at Haslam Park with a dummy in its mouth. Credit: Andrew Badley | Andrew Badley

Andrew told the Post: “Haslam park is my local patch, where I like to take wildlife photos, as my hobby. These shots were a once in a lifetime spot, I did a double take! The right place at the right time but I’m always observant. You never know what will turn up, as this proved.”

In pictures shared with the Post, which Andrew describes as “sad”, the duck can be seen clutching a brown, rusted pacifier in its beak, as if using it for the purpose intended.

Andrew explained he saw the duck fight off competition for the baby's dummy before later dropping the item once he realised it was inedible.

The duck fought off its peers for the 'prized' dummy. Credit: Andrew BadleyThe duck fought off its peers for the 'prized' dummy. Credit: Andrew Badley
The duck fought off its peers for the 'prized' dummy. Credit: Andrew Badley | Andrew Badley

Andrew added: “It just shows how discarded rubbish ends up being a potential threat to wildlife. The duck had hold of the dummy, for a good, few minutes, warding off other drakes, who must have thought it was food. No harm came to the ducks, thankfully.”

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