A walker who fell in the Lake District spent four hours crawling down a hill after breaking his arm

A walker who fell in the Lake District spent four hours crawling down a hill after breaking his arm, leg and ribs in the spirit of legendary mountaineer, Doug Scott, he claimed.

Wednesday, 21st April 2021, 5:37 pm
Updated Wednesday, 21st April 2021, 5:46 pm

The man suffered the injuries after slipping on steep ground while descending Eagle Crag, a 521metre (1,709 ft) fell in the Cumbrian beauty spot.

He was airlifted to hospital after being rescued by volunteers from the Keswick Mountain Rescue Team.

He told rescuers he channelled the spirit of legendary mountaineer Doug Scott, who famously crawled on his hands and knees while injured during a descent of The Ogre - a mountain 7,285 metres high in Pakistan - in 1977.

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He was airlifted to hospital after being rescued by volunteers from the Keswick Mountain Rescue Team.

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A spokesman for the rescue team said: "Being a long way from the beaten path his whistles went unheard so, as he said, in the spirit of the late Doug Scott and his epic descent of the Ogre he spent the next 3-4 hours crawling very painfully down the slope.

"Eventually he reached the lower slopes of Greenup Ghyll and was spotted by walkers from the path on the other side of the stream."

An air ambulance was called, but the man was flown to hospital by the coastguard helicopter when rescuers realised the extent of his injuries.

Two of the walkers had ran down the valley to raise the alarm while another stayed with the man and bandaged his leg.

When Keswick Mountain Rescue volunteers arrived after 8pm on Monday night he told them his whistles went unheard as he was so far from the path.

He was assessed by a team doctor and given strong painkillers before being flown to hospital.

The spokesman added: "Fortunately there was a large enough low angle area close by that the helicopter was able to land light, still under power so as not to sink into the soft ground, to enable the man to be loaded for onward transport to hospital."

The daring three hour, 38 minute rescue mission saw 21 team members called out, the spokesman added.

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