Man and woman are created equal. Discuss

Nicola Adam, Group Editor
Nicola Adam, Group Editor
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Sometimes I feel proud to live in such forward-thinking, modern times, where men and women are created equal but with all their glorious differences, or something.

Then, as usual, I come crashing back to the earth as if I was a gold-medal winning Olympian female athlete whose husband has been given all the credit for her win.

Yes, that actually happened.

It is actually getting pretty tedious to hear casual sexism and male entitlement still up and running in this day and age.

Though it does feel like every media outlet/social media site is revelling in doing each other down inthe political correctness stakes (it’s practically an Olympic sport in itself) - the fact is, it does remain unnacceptable to witch-hunt a female TV presenter for wearing a short-ish mid-thigh dress in a stifling TV studio.

This irony was not missed by many who noted nobody was critiquing a male presenter for wearing shorts hitched up to the point of hotpants.

Poor Helen Skelton - the irony is she is the best BBC presenter out in Rio by a mile.

And frightening thing is that much of this criticism was by women, undermining the fight for gender equality one by one.

Jealous of a successful young woman who ooks great in a short dress - much?

But sexual equality and gender sensitivity runs much deeper than a presenter’s off the cuff comments, or the assumptions that lie deep within sports and life.

Here in Lancashire we have just reported news of the sad death of the Duke of Westminster, a man who owns half the country and is certainly one of the richest.

Hot on the heels of this shock, the news that his 25-year-old son will inherit his millions, leaving his two elder sisters high and dry with nowt.

Though I’m sure they have trust funds to keep them in pearls it does seem unbelievable that such sexism is ongoing.

And while it remains acceptable to authenticate male superiority with law, there is little hope for the woman athletes who achieve Olympic greatness with not a single man in sight.