Full steam ahead as They Eat Culture put Preston on the art map

Preston creative group 'They Eat Culture' are looking to make Preston the central and best place in Lancs and NW for art and cultural experiences
Preston creative group 'They Eat Culture' are looking to make Preston the central and best place in Lancs and NW for art and cultural experiences
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As the summer got underway an arts collective launched 100 days of creative events in Preston in a bid to transform the city into a major cultural centre.

They Eat Culture is working full steam ahead to bring an alternative arty offering to Preston to put the city on a par neighbouring Manchester and Liverpool.

Director Ruth Heritage says she is fed up of the city being referred to a ‘DePreston’.

So she took the matter into her own hands and launched a string of events offering a fresh take on culture and art to the city over the summer months.

To date there have been art shows, album discussion groups, a vegan market and poetry sessions and there is plenty more on its way.

Speaking to the Post ahead of the launch of the initiative Ruth said: “We are developing a voice for Preston as a major part of the Lancashire narrative.

“We want Preston on the national agenda at all times, for the right reasons, for investment into the city.”

The hub is also presenting opportunities for the city’s artists looking to make a name for themselves in their back garden rather than having to trek to Liverpool or Manchester.

The group has organised its Weekender sessions hosted by The People’s Production Lab in Guildhall Street.

PPL Weekender programme producer Helen Ficorilli said: “It gives an opportunity for designers and creators to present their work where they might have got lost elsewhere.

“We will have Friday night residencies that are low-key events for people to drop in and out of.

“There will be album-of-the-month sessions to break down, discuss, and learn from contemporary recordings.”

Poetry sessions with the Damson Poets, who regularly performed at the former coffee shop Ham & Jam, are also in the mix.

“We are building the programme gradually,” said Inskip-born Ruth, “but we want people to check in and make sure the events are running how they want them to be.

“We want people to be part of the long-term set up.”

Among the dreams becoming a reality at The People’s Production Lab are coffee roasting workshops, live shows and a new cinema space.