Invitation to take part in celebrations marking the contribution of the Windrush Generation to Preston

June 22 1948:  The ex-troopship 'Empire Windrush' arriving at Tilbury Docks from Jamaica, with 482 Jamaicans on board, emigrating to Britain.  (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
June 22 1948: The ex-troopship 'Empire Windrush' arriving at Tilbury Docks from Jamaica, with 482 Jamaicans on board, emigrating to Britain. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
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The impact of the Windrush Generation on life in Preston is being commemorated by two  special events in the city.

After scooping £5,400 of Government funding, Preston Black History Group has organised two presentation events - the first at UCLan’s Foster Building today from 12-3pm and the second at The Seventh Day Adventist Church in Grimshaw Street tomorrow, from 11.15am and from 4-6pm.

>>>Read the original story about the funding here

Speakers at both events will aim to explore the social, economic and cultural contributions of the black communuity to Preston and Lancashire, as well as the effect of the Windrush Scandal, concerning people who were wrongly detained, denied legal rights, threatened with or actually deported by the Home Office.

One of the speakers will be Sekeena Kydd, who, despite being born in England, was not officially registered as British because of paperwork complications related to her West Indian-born mother and grandparents passports.

“It’s still affecting everyday people’s lives in ways people didn’t realise it would”, said Clinton Smith, chairman of the Preston Black History Group.

The presentations will also look at the presence of black people in Britain before Windrush and the impact of the black community on the area’s music, food and workforces.

One presentation will be from an NHS representative who will pay tribute to the people who came from the Caribbean to work as nurses or nursing assistants in the Preston area.

Clinton added: “It’s really important that we do this. We want to say thank you and challenge the perception that black people don’t give back to the community.

“I would ask people to come down, to listen - it’s part of your history and culture.”

To attend the UCLan event for free, booking is required. Reserve a place by clicking here.