Reader’s letters - Monday April 20, 2015

Then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher hands over a copy of the deeds  to a council house buyer in 1980. But as David Cameron pledges to reboot the right-to-buy scheme, reader Mary Kane questions the legacy (see letter)
Then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher hands over a copy of the deeds to a council house buyer in 1980. But as David Cameron pledges to reboot the right-to-buy scheme, reader Mary Kane questions the legacy (see letter)
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‘Scheme only helps a few’

In reply to Bernard Darbyshire’s email (LEP Thursday, April 16) Margaret Thatcher’s ‘Right to Buy’ policy may have helped some hard working people by giving them the chance to own their own homes but at what cost to other hard working people wanting a house to rent at a reasonable price, as was meant to be the case with the council house?

As a result of the ‘right to buy’ policy many people now unable to rent through the council have to rent through private landlords paying much higher rents than they would have done on a council property. These too are hard working people trying to save to buy a home of their own in the future with little opportunity of doing so whilst having to pay to rent privately.

Why should a small minority be able to benefit from being able to buy a vastly reduced former council property when other ‘hard working people’ have to pay the full property price on the open market? Many of these people then go on and sell their former council properties at a large profit and as a result there is now very little available council property available to rent.

Due to this policy many young people cannot get access to a home near to where they grew up - where is the ‘freedom’ in this? I am not knocking the people who have bought their council homes, why wouldn’t they, but Margaret Thatcher knew best did she? Many ordinary ‘hard working’ people would beg to differ I think and not just with regard to this policy and it’s legacy!

Mary Kane

via email

Bring back UK’s trading power

It is to be regretted that Britain’s trade deficit, which has doubled, should not be a major topic of debate during the election campaign. For it reflects not merely a financial problem, but what is more important, the continuing de-industrialisation of our country. Although the attention paid to this problem has varied by politicians from Mrs Thatcher, who denied that there was any problem, to Heseltine, who was more aware of it, very little has been done to solve it.

However the Cole Commission, an independent body charged by Ed Balls, Labour’s shadow chancellor, to address UK’s 30 year trade deficit. It’s says the next Prime Minister should take personal charge of export policy to reverse Britain’s declining share of world trade and chair a cabinet committee dedicated to exports and promote to the cabinet trade minister who will be subjected to scrutiny by a newly formed House of Commons select committee.

The British nation is probably the most inventive in the world, but so many of it’s inventions have been developed and manufactured abroad, e.g. Britain pioneered railways and nuclear power stations but now has to import them from Germany, France, China and Canada. Britain has much more wind energy pylons than all the rest of the world combined; all of them made in Denmark and Germany. Even the manufacturers we have in Britain are mainly in the ownership of foreign companies. But what irks me most of all; my favourite sauce, “H.P.” is now made in Holland together with it’s House of Commons label! It doesn’t seem the same as it used to be - nor does the House of Commons.

Former MP Ron Atkins,

Preston

Report made my heart sink

Having just read your report on the case of Andrea Hill’s fictitious fall at Andrew Gibson’s store and subsequent claim for compensation.

It really made my heart sink to read the report. To think that scum of her ilk stand to get away with making fortune’s (and possibly bankrupting honest hard working people along the way) for telling a few lies.

Worst of all is they know full well that if they get found out they will only receive a slap on the wrist.

On the front page, you posted a picture of Andrew Gibson’s store where absolutely nothing happened.

It would have been far better as a warning to all, to post a 
photograph of Andrea Hill on your front page.

John Hough

via email

Tax will lead to flytipping

Labour controlled Lancashire County Council have introduced a charge of £3.50 per bag to dump inert waste at their recycling centres throughout Lancashire which will result in fly tipping all over the county . This policy is a ridiculous nonsense. It covers items such tiles bricks wash hand basins and a wide range of things resulting from DIY work carried out by householders. It is the sort of recycling we should be encouraging not deterring it with charges .

The cost of clearing up the fly tipping will be greater than the return that it will bring to Lancashire County Council . Voters who have been warned about the introduction of these charges have reacted to us on the doorstep and the proposal should be suspended until such time as local authorities in Lancashire can express a view.It will effect the countryside more than anywhere else. We are suffering in Lancashire from a surfeit of fly-tipping and this will lead to more local authorities will have to pick up the bill which means increased council . From an environmental point of view this is a dreadful decision. So often I have walked down a country lane to find a pile of builders rubble dumped by the road that has to be cleared up. These charges are a fly tippers charter .

The recycler is charged for a bag of inert waste 90cm by 60cm and if they have not applied for a licence .If a member of the public has applied the licence only entitles the licence holder to dump 10 bags before paying £3.50 for each successive bag.

Eric Pickles, the Conservative Secretary of State for Communities, has made illegal for local authorities to charge for items put in bins , this is a way to out flank these regulations.

Ken Hind

Clitheroe

Story made my heart sink

Having just read your report on the case of Andrea Hill’s fictitious fall at Andrew Gibsons store and subsequent claim for compensation.

It really made my heart sink to read the report. To think that people of her ilk stand to get away with making fortunes (and possibly bankrupting honest, hard-working people along the way) for telling a few lies. Worst of all is they know full well that if they get found out they will only receive a slap on the wrist.

On the front page, you posted a picture of Andrew Gibson’s store where absolutely nothing happened. It would have been far better as a warning to all, to post a photograph of Andrea Hill on your front page.

John Hough

via email