Weathervane returns to St Walburge's Church in Preston for a visit

A church weathervane which once had the best view in Preston is to return home for a brief spell.

Wednesday, 15th August 2018, 10:10 am
Updated Thursday, 16th August 2018, 3:47 pm
Canon Scott Tanner with the historic weathervane at St Walburge church

The copper and brass cockerel has spent that last 30 years at the Harris Museum and Art Gallery.

But it once graced the top of the spire of St Walburge’s Roman Catholic Church - which boasts the tallest parish church spire and the third tallest spire in Britain.

Now, for six months only, the weathervane, which weighs 56lbs, will be returning to St Walburge’s.

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Canon Scott Tanner with the historic weathervane at St Walburge church

Sanam Ogden, project restoration manager, said: “St Walburge’s Weathervane is coming home.

“It was put into care at the Harris and we’re so pleased that it’s coming back to us on a short term loan of six months.

“It will be placed in a little chapel called the Winter chapel.”

The church will be opening for Heritage Open Days to exhibit to weathervane on September 8, 9 and 15.

Canon Scott Tanner with the historic weathervane at St Walburge church

The cockerel weathervane was made by Atkinson & Son of Preston in 1866.

It was designed by the architect Joseph Hansom and completed in 1866.

The people of Preston knew it as the Maudland Cock and it even acquired its own saying, “When the Maudland Cock drinks out of the Ribble there will be rain.”

The cock remained in place until 1931 when it was removed after it was found to be no longer turning and declared dangerous.

James Arnold and Stephen Jack of the Harris Museum returning the historic weathervane to St Walburge church

It was then replaced with a gun metal spike.

The weathervane