Prime Minister Boris Johnson points out 'aching gaps' in Lancashire life expectancy during Conservative Party Conference

Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed differences in Lancashire's life expectancy ages during his Tory party conference speech today - asking "what Royal Jelly are [Ribble Valley] eating?"

Wednesday, 6th October 2021, 4:52 pm
Updated Wednesday, 6th October 2021, 5:13 pm

Addressing inequalities between regions' life expectancies, Mr Johnson said: "We have one of the most imbalanced societies and lopsided economies of all the richer countries.

"It's not just that there's a gap between London and the South-East and the rest of the country, there are 18 gaps within the regions themselves.

"What monkey glands are they applying in Ribble Valley? What Royal Jelly are they eating that they live seven years longer than the people of Blackpool, only 33 miles away?

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed differences in Lancashire's life expectancy ages during his Tory party conference speech.

"That's not just a question of social justice, it is an appalling waste of potential - and it's holding this country back. Because there is no reason why the inhabitants of one part of the country should be geographically fated to be poorer than others."

According to figures by Lancashire County Council, life expectancy at birth for males in Blackpool is the lowest in England - at the age of 74.5.

But in the Ribble Valley, men can expect to live until the age of 80.9.

The life expectancy for females in Blackpool is 79.5, in comparison to 84.5 in the Ribble Valley.

Based on the figures for 2017-2019, the overall life expectancy for anyone living in the Ribble Valley is more than six years longer than residents in Blackpool.

Mr Johnson, who went on to speak about "levelling up," continued: “Levelling up works for the whole country, and is the right and responsible policy.”

A "levelling up premium" of £3,000 was also announced, in a bid to encourage maths and science teachers to work in different parts of the country.