Mum hits out at school ban on fidget spinners

A typical fidget spinner
A typical fidget spinner
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A mum who claims a fidget spinner proved a “miraculous” help to her son’s ability to learn has hit out at schools choosing to ban the gadgets.

The young pupil from Buckinghamshire was given a lunchtime detention after fiddling with his £5 fidget spinner during lesson time.

“I was furious,” said his mum.

“I don’t agree with the fidget spinner ban. My son is on the autistic spectrum and I found it amazing how much this thing helped him to concentrate. He was a different child when he had his fidget spinner.”

Schools across the UK have been banning fidget spinners citing the fact they can be disruptive to learning.

Demand for the spinners has been exponential in recent weeks. A basic fidget spinner consists of a bearing in the center of a design made from any of a variety of materials including brass, stainless steel, titanium, copper and plastic. The toy has been advertised as helping people who have trouble focusing or fidgeting - such as those with ADHD, autism, or anxiety - by acting as a release mechanism for nervous energy or stress.

Experts have been divided on those claims, with some supporting it while others disputed its scientific basis and argued the toy may actually be more distracting.

Although they were invented in the 1990s, fidget spinners have attracted global popularity this year.

What do you think? Should fidget spinners be banned in schools?