Leyland's popular Veterans Cafe goes on the march to new premises

Representatives from Veterans Caf meeting HRH Duke of Kent as part of his visit to the borough in May.
Representatives from Veterans Caf meeting HRH Duke of Kent as part of his visit to the borough in May.
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Leyland's Veteran’s Café - the popular hub for vets from the local area and further afield - has moved.

The Veteran’s café, the well-loved café hub for veterans from the local area and further afield, has moved.

The café is now located at 2nd Leyland Scout Hut, Eden Street in Leyland - just behind the big Tesco.

The café is open from 10 am to 1pm on the first and third Saturday of the month.

Phil Burton, founder of the Veteran’s Cafe said. “The café has now been open for two-and-a-half years and it has grown beyond our wildest dreams.

“We attract veterans from all over the country as far as Newcastle and Leicester and we have regulars who enjoy the café each time it’s open.

“We’re delighted with our new location and look forward to seeing even more people come along.”

Established in 2016, the aim of the cafe is to give the veterans from the local area, and further afield a place to meet others from the military family, to create a place to socialise, and also to signpost veterans that have difficulties in any way to the relevant support services.

Councillor Derek Forrest, Armed Forces Champion, said, “It’s fantastic to have such a thriving hub for ex-servicemen and women in South Ribble.

“The café allows veterans space to get great food and drink, socialise and importantly receive vital support.

“It’s a wonderful community of patrons, staff and volunteers who are passionate about the welfare of our veterans and dedicated to making sure that those who need

support can get it.

“If you are a part of the military family who haven’t come along to the café before, I would absolutely recommend you do!”

FThe café came about after Phil Burton, a former Royal Artillery Lance Bombardier, came to South Ribble Council to ask if it could help to co-ordinate veterans’ support services better. When people are in the Forces, there is a brotherhood that the military depends on to get the job done, but servicemen and women lose that when they leave.”