`

'Uplifting' live music brought to Royal Preston Hospital to boost patient morale and well-being

Catherine Roberts, Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, introduced the concept onto the ICU at Royal Preston Hospital
Catherine Roberts, Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, introduced the concept onto the ICU at Royal Preston Hospital
0
Have your say

A first of its kind music-inspired initiative has been launched at Royal Preston Hospital to boost the morale of critically ill patients.

The initiative, called ICU-Hear, offers live music to critically ill patients on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), provided by charity group Music In Hospitals and Care.

The initiative, calledICU-Hear, offers live music to critically ill patients on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), provided by charity group Music In Hospitals and Care

The initiative, calledICU-Hear, offers live music to critically ill patients on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), provided by charity group Music In Hospitals and Care

A hospital spokesman said: “The aim of this initiative is to provide a soothing, relaxing, calming and even uplifting atmosphere for patients who are critically ill in hospital.

“The music aims to make the critical care unit less clinical and provide a calming ambience for patients.”

The music is played live rather than on the radio or a similar platform to allow musicians to alter their tone or pace accordingly in response to the behaviour of the patient.

Catherine Roberts, Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, introduced the concept onto the ICU at Royal Preston Hospital.

It is the first of its kind in Lancashire, and was officially launched at an event on Wednesday.

Catherine, pictured inset, said: “ICU Hear has only been launched in a couple of hospitals so far, and we are excited to be the first in Lancashire to be offering this fantastic service.

“Being in our Intensive Care Unit can be an extremely scary, daunting and unnerving experience, and we always aim to do anything that we can to try to help our patients to feel more comfortable.”

Holly Marland played the kora - an African harp - for patients as part of the launch event, which was funded by the Governor Patient Experience Charitable Fund.

The initiative was started by a former ICU patient at Manchester Royal Infirmary at a regional support group.