Homeowners voice concerns over heavy traffic following fresh plans at Clayton-le-Woods site

Residents of Clayton-le-Woods went to a consultation on fresh plans for a McCarthy & Stone retirement village and Lidl
Residents of Clayton-le-Woods went to a consultation on fresh plans for a McCarthy & Stone retirement village and Lidl
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An increase in traffic is the main worry for Clayton-le-Woods residents as the historic Pines hotel looks set to be redeveloped.

The site, which sits just off the A6, a main artery between Bamber Bridge and Chorley, could see a retirement village and supermarket built.

Developer McCarthy and Stone has announced plans to use the site for a retirement village and German discount supermarket Lidl is also hoping to bring a store to the area.

Homeowners living around the land in question were largely against the Lidl but in favour of the retirement village.

They highlighted the affects on the weight of traffic the proposals could have on the A6 as a major concern at a consultation meeting on Tuesday.

Stuart Cross, who lives in Well Orchard, said: “I would not like to be in a queue waiting to turn right onto the A6. It’s such a busy road all day long but particularly at school times.”

Pamela Hayhurst, 85, of Radburn Close was in agreement with him. She said: “Traffic on the A6 entrance is bad enough already.”

Another Radburn Close resident who did not want to be named said: “I think the Lidl store is totally inappropriate. Personally I have no objection to the McCarthy & Stone retirement homes but the Lidl store, definitely. We must have about 16 supermarkets in a four mile radius of the hotel.”

A spokesman from Lidl, which could create up to 40 new jobs, said “As part of our ongoing consultation process we will be working closely with the highways agency and reviewing all feedback from the consultation to ensure that our proposal offers the best solution for the current road network layout.

“Having closely reviewed all options, it’s strongly believed that a shared entrance to the site will cause less impact to the highway, both in its long term operation and short term construction. This is due to the low number of cars predicted to use the retirement home and intention to use an entrance which already exists and requires minimal alteration.”

Bosses at Lidl say the store will open 8am-10pm between Mondays-Saturdays, and 10am-4pm on Sundays.

They anticipate that the store will have one delivery per day with vehicles avoiding rush hour.

Meanwhile residents of Preston Road, whose homes back directly onto the proposed living accommodation, were against the plans altogether.

Pamela Hardiman, 73, and John, 62, and Helen, 55, Boyd, voiced their concerns.

“We will be overlooked by residents from their Juliet balconies,” said John.

They also raised questions about the noise and light pollution which would increase with the 32 space car park at the bottom of their gardens.

Ian Wilkins, regional managing director for McCarthy and Stone North West Region, said: “Prior to the exhibition, we met neighbours to the site and listened to their views. As part of our plans, we will keep the mature tree line boundary and provide additional screening to provide additional privacy for neighbouring properties.

“Further to this, we will plant additional trees to maximise the landscaping of the site and to ease neighbours’ concerns.

“We will now collate all the comments received and where possible, amend our plans accordingly.”