Pupils write a bit of history

Winmarleigh CE Primary school pupils had a chance to see Florence Nightingale's inkwell
Winmarleigh CE Primary school pupils had a chance to see Florence Nightingale's inkwell

Youngsters at a tiny village school have been playing their part in living history, by getting the chance to see for themselves relics from the past.

Class One pupils at Winmarleigh CE Primary School, nesar Garstang, had a very interesting visitor.

Colonel Bernard Stam from Winmarleigh village brought in to the school an inkwell belonging to the pioneer of modern nursing Florence Nightingale and was used during her time at the army hospital in Scutari from 1854 to 1856.

Colonel Bernard Stam from Winmarleigh village brought in to the school an inkwell belonging to the pioneer of modern nursing Florence Nightingale and was used during her time at the army hospital in Scutari from 1854 to 1856.

As part of their history topic, Colonel Bernard Stam from Winmarleigh village managed to borrow Florence Nightingale’s inkwell from the Lancashire Infantry Museum and took it into the school for pupils to see.

The children were given an insight into the story of the woman known as The Lady of the Lamp and best known for her work at Scutari hospital, Turkey, during the Crimean War and then afterwards for her role in developing nursing as a profession.

Reception and Key Stage One class teacher Clare Darling said: “It was a beautiful piece of history which pupils were fascinated with and had lots of questions to ask about.

She added: “Special thanks to Bernard for bringing the inkwell in.

Colonel Bernard Stam from Winmarleigh village brought in to the school an inkwell belonging to the pioneer of modern nursing Florence Nightingale and was used during her time at the army hospital in Scutari from 1854 to 1856.

Colonel Bernard Stam from Winmarleigh village brought in to the school an inkwell belonging to the pioneer of modern nursing Florence Nightingale and was used during her time at the army hospital in Scutari from 1854 to 1856.

It really gave the pupils the opportunity to think about Florence’s time working in Scutari.

Oscar Parker -Year One, said: “It was really interesting learning about how Florence Nightingale wrote with the ink and not a pen”.

The youngsters heard that The Museum is housed in the traditional home of the old county infantry regiments at Fulwood Barracks, Preston.