"This is what my dog looked like after nearly dying from eating cannabis", Leyland woman's warning after pet eats drug-laced cookie

Billy, a 6-year-old Cavachon (Cavalier King Charles and Bichon Frise cross) had to be rushed to the vets after eating a cookie laced with cannabis on a walk in Leyland on Saturday (September 14)
Billy, a 6-year-old Cavachon (Cavalier King Charles and Bichon Frise cross) had to be rushed to the vets after eating a cookie laced with cannabis on a walk in Leyland on Saturday (September 14)
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A Leyland woman has shared a video of her dog's reaction to cannabis in a warning to others about the drug's dangerous effects on pets.

As reported on Monday, a dog in Leyland was rushed to the vets after eating a cookie laced with cannabis on a walk near Worden Park on Saturday (September 14).

Poor Billy could barely stand or lift his head for more than 24 hours and had to remain under the close supervision of vets overnight

Poor Billy could barely stand or lift his head for more than 24 hours and had to remain under the close supervision of vets overnight

Leyland teacher Sarah Eccles had been heading home with her 6-year-old Cavachon, Billy, when she spotted the Cavalier King Charles and Bichon Frise cross sniffing at something in the grass.

Sarah investigated and found two chocolate cookies with a distinctive smell of cannabis.

But it was too late for Billy - the cheeky Cavachon had already taken a bite out of one of the biscuits.

Sarah is now urging dog walkers to watch a video of Billy under the influence of the drug and to familiarise themselves with the warning signs of intoxication.

One of two cannabis cookies found in Parkgate Drive, near Worden Park on Saturday evening (September 14)

One of two cannabis cookies found in Parkgate Drive, near Worden Park on Saturday evening (September 14)

"People take care", said Sarah.

"Remain vigilant when out walking. If you see any more cookies, keep your dogs away or seek medical advice immediately."

After returning home, Sarah kept a watchful eye on him. Within two hours, Billy had started to suffer from fits and could no longer stand. He also lost control

Spotting the early signs of intoxication in her dog, Sarah phoned the emergency vets at Myerscough College and reported what had happened.

Siân Smith, a vet working for Myerscough Veterinary Group, asked Sarah to bring Billy in immediately.

His heart rate had slowed dramatically, he had difficulty walking and suffered from tremors. He also struggled with incontinence after losing control of his bladder.

Less than an hour later, vets had given a dazed Billy an emetic injection to induce vomiting and had inserted an IV line to provide him with fluids.

He remained at the veterinary practice overnight under the close supervision of a nurse.

READ MORE: Leyland dog Billy rushed to vets after becoming stoned from eating cannabis cookie found near Worden Park
READ MORE: Vet warns pet owners of the dangers posed by cannabis after dog accidentally eats cookie laced with the drug
Ms Smith said Sarah's vigilant quick-thinking might have saved Billy's life.

"Cannabis can be really harmful to dogs," Sian said, "and with baked goods, chocolate is toxic to them as well, so we would always advise owners to seek immediate medical attention.

"Treatment very much depends on how much they've eaten - and how long ago since they ate it," Siân said.

"If it happened very recently, we can give an emetic injection to make them sick.

"But if it's after a few hours, it will already be digested, and we have to explore supportive treatment options.

"It's important to seek medical advice as soon as possible."

On Monday, Sarah said Billy had begun to return to his former self, as she continued his treatment at home.

"He’s started eating again today and taken his ball out for us in the garden to throw. That’s when you know he’s feeling better!", said a relieved Sarah.

"Bless him. Yesterday (Sunday, September 15) was a write-off. He didn't know where he was!"