Care home is told to improve or face closure

Euxton Park Care Home
Euxton Park Care Home
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A care home has been told it has six months to improve – or it could face closure.

Euxton Park Care Home has been placed in special measures after being judged as “inadequate” in four out of five areas by inspectors from the Care Quality Commission.

The home has been told it now has six months to improve or could have its CQC registration cancelled, meaning it would not be able to operate.

The unannounced inspection was carried out in August and followed an inspection earlier this year when bosses were told action was needed in three inspection areas.

Debbie Westhead, the CQC’s deputy chief inspector of adult social care in the north, said: “It is unacceptable that the provider has allowed the quality of service to continue to deteriorate.

“We found areas of poor care at our previous inspection in January and it is of serious concern that these issues have not been fully addressed.

“We will re-inspect the home within six months to check whether sufficient improvements have been made. If we find that the service being provided remains inadequate, we will consider taking further steps to cancel its registration with CQC.”

Debbie Westhead, CQC

“We will re-inspect the home within six months to check whether sufficient improvements have been made.

“If we find that the service being provided remains inadequate, we will consider taking further steps to cancel its registration with CQC.”

One relative, who visits the home every day to make sure their loved one is being looked after properly, said: “If I thought everything was absolutely perfect there I wouldn’t go every day, but I’m only going because I need to keep an eye on her and make sure she is okay. I shouldn’t have to do that.”

While they say there are “some really good caring people” working there, they believe more staff are needed.

Staffing levels was one of the issues noted by the CQC in their inspection report.

They rated the overall service provided as “inadequate” and placed the home, on Wigan Road in Euxton, in special measures. It now has six months to improve.

The care home, owned by Four Seasons Healthcare, offers nursing or personal care for up to 63 people.

The CQC gave “inadequate” ratings when looking at whether the service was safe, effective, caring and well-led.

They found the fifth category – looking at whether the service was responsive – “requires improvement”.

The CQC’s report identified several areas where improvements were needed.

It said the home was not sufficiently staffed to ensure people’s needs could be fully met and staff were not supported with sufficient training to care for people.

People using the service spoke about having to wait for an hour when they used an alarm to buzz for assistance.

Inspectors were concerned that risks were not well managed and people were not protected against the risks associated with unsafe use and management of medicines.

Medication records were found to be “inaccurate and incomplete”, supplies of medicines and medical devices were out-of-date and controlled drugs had not been disposed of safely, the report said.

There were also concerns that people at risk of poor nutrition, people were at risk of being deprived of their liberty, healthcare needs were not always being met and care plans lacked sufficient detail.

And there were no systems in place to monitor the quality of the service being provided, the CQC’s report said.

A spokesman for Four Seasons Healthcare said: “The well-being of people living in the home is our first consideration and we take the Care Quality Commission’s findings very seriously.

“We are encouraged that the CQC inspectors said that they saw staff who approached people in a kind and patient manner. They acknowledged that the majority of people they spoke with said they felt safe when receiving care and that some people described a service they felt was responsive to their needs.

“However, we are sorry that, overall, Euxton Park Care Home was not meeting the standards of care that we expect all of our homes to provide and we are carrying out a comprehensive improvement plan that is being overseen by the home manager and our regional management team.

“We recently introduced a ‘Quality of Life’ programme that enables residents, relatives, our staff and care professionals to provide immediate feedback on any aspect of care, using iPads placed in the home that are linked to purpose-designed software. We are now using their feedback effectively to find and fix issues.”