£600,000 price tag on Bonds of Elswick restaurant site

An illustration from the planning application for the Bonds of Elswick site
An illustration from the planning application for the Bonds of Elswick site
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A £600,000 price tag has been put on the land occupied by one of Lancashire’s most popular ice cream restaurants.

The Bonds of Elswick restaurant closed its doors in December last year but the ice cream kiosk and cafe at the site are still operating and the family has continued to produce its famous ice cream for shops and restaurants across the North West.

The brand is still sold at Bonds Lane from the kiosk and a spokesman today said that a buyer for the firm continues to be sought with a view to selling the business as a going concern.

At the time, owner Martin Molloy has said he was looking to retire and decided to close the restaurant section of the site, but a decision was taken later to continue selling ices from the kiosk since they were still making the ice cream for a wide variety of retailers

The kiosk and cafe, which can seat around 30, is open seven days a week and offers its full range of flavours from vanilla, mint and chocolate though to raspberry pavlova, praline and even sherry trifle.

READ MORE: Bonds ice cream boss confirms closure of popular parlour

Anyone buying the 0.6 acre site for a luxury housing development would have to demolish the restaurant first but the land is at the centre of a sought after residential area.

Outline planning permission was granted by Fylde Council for homes on the site in February last year after no objections were received from Elswick Parish Council.

READ MORE: You have your say on closure of Bond’s of Elswick

Some of the trees on the site are subject to a protection order but other wise there were no major conditions placed on the site.

Tree and landscape officer Alan Wallbank said: “One mature ash tree fronts the road, while there are several alders and an attractive multiple- stemmed white willow here. These have an aggregate value as a group of trees and present a nice break between the prospective and existing developments.”

Bonds’ owner Martin Molloy said at the time of the restaurant’s closure that he hoped a buyer would at least be found for the ice cream factory.

He said: “The time has come for me to retire.

“The premises has been up for sale and the ice cream business is still up for sale and I am hoping the right buyer will come along.”