Improving outcomes for people with motor neurone disease in Lancashire

Members of Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board met people living'with MND
Members of Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board met people living'with MND
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The Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board has adopted the motor neurone disease (MND) Charter, thanks to a joint effort by people living with MND and volunteers in Lancashire, the Lancashire and South Cumbria Motor Neurone Disease Care and Research Centre at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and the MND Association.

The MND Charter is a statement of the respect, care and support that people living with motor neurone disease, and their carers, should expect. The charter consists of five key statements including “The right to an early diagnosis and information”.

Pauline Callagher, MND service coordinator at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, said: “We are delighted that the Health and Wellbeing Board at Lancashire County Council has adopted the MND Charter; which will support patients living within MND in our area.”

Members of the Board were invited to meet people living with MND in Lancashire and learn about the specialist care provided by the Lancashire and South Cumbria MND Care Centre team, as well as the research led by Professor Suresh Chhetri to find a cure for the disease.

Lancashire Teaching Hospitals also recently joined the ENCALS (European Network to Cure ALS) network to create more opportunities to improve the care for patients with motor neurone disease throughout Lancashire and south Cumbria.

Suresh Chhetri, consultant neurologist at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, said: “Being an ENCALS centre opens up new opportunities for international collaborations, including research activity and drug trials, which is brilliant.Our centre is proud to play a part in the global fight against MND.”

Motor Neurone Disease (MND) is a fatal, rapidly progressing disease which affects the brain and spinal cord. It attacks the nerves that control movement and eventually leaves people unable to move, communicate or breathe. It kills a third of people within a year of diagnosis and half within two years. There is currently no cure.