These were the scenes in Bolton as a surge in the Indian variant continues

Residents in Bolton are taking advantage of easing restrictions despite a surge in the Indian variant of covid as a huge vaccination and testing drive continues in the town.

Wednesday, 19th May 2021, 7:32 pm
Updated Wednesday, 19th May 2021, 7:34 pm
Residents in Bolton are taking advantage of easing restrictions

The have been fears the army could be deployed to the streets amid worries the town may be plunged back into the toughest of restrictions.

Coronavirus cases in the area have surged to more than 300 in 100,000, according to the latest Public Health England data and it has the highest covid rate in the country.
The have been fears the army could be deployed to the streets amid worries the town may be plunged back into the toughest of restrictions.

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But locals were pictured happily enjoying their new freedoms in pubs and cafes after restrictions were eased nationally.
The town's council leader David Greenhalgh said there are fears locals will take to the streets in protest at any new move to shut pubs and shops.
It comes after fears were raised that areas where the new variant is rampant could be hit with the return of Tier 4 restrictions while the rules are relaxed elsewhere.
Pubgoers enjoyed pints while hungry shoppers took a break in local cafes to eat inside.
Speaking on Radio 4's Today programme this morning (Wed), he said: "We’ve been there before and they don’t work – not in a dense conurbation like Greater Manchester.
“This happened before, the spread increased because people travelled 50 yards across the county boundary to access hospitality that they can’t in their own area.”
Asked if he had told Mr Hancock there would be civil unrest, he said: “I do think there is a danger of unrest.
“There is a great deal of resentment. Bolton was... we were disproportionately affected really since July last year.
“Even when our rates were coming down, we still remained in lockdown when other areas’ rates were higher than ours, so there was a build up of resentment."