New school is top of the class

Olive School pupils Aminah Rizwan Desai helped her school score 100 per cent in the Year one phonics assessment in 2017 puttting it in the top 3 per cent nationally
Olive School pupils Aminah Rizwan Desai helped her school score 100 per cent in the Year one phonics assessment in 2017 puttting it in the top 3 per cent nationally

Preston’s newest primary school is proving a class act.

The Olive School in Primrose Hill only opened in 2016 and is already impressing education chiefs.

Olive School pupils at  the new  school scored 100 per cent in the Year one phonics assessment in 2017 puttting it in the top 3 per cent nationally

Olive School pupils at the new school scored 100 per cent in the Year one phonics assessment in 2017 puttting it in the top 3 per cent nationally

The free school, has been named in the nation’s top three per cent for its use of the controversial phonics reading system.

Every pupil who took the year one phonics test last summer passed and exceeded the required standard.

Schools standards minister Nick Gibb described The Olive’s results as an “outstanding achievement”.

In a letter to school he said: “Your success in teaching phonics means your pupils are developing a firm foundation in reading, from which they can become increasingly fluent and develop a lifelong love of reading.”

School principal Majid Ditta said: “It’s incredibly satisfying that our first ever cohort of Year 1 pupils achieved a 100 per cent pass rate in the 2017 phonics screening check.

“This demonstrates the standard for the excellent teaching and learning we aim to achieve at The Olive School.

“The result highlights the firm grounding these pupils have in the early decoding skills necessary from which to build their reading ability. I would also hope our pupils continue to develop a love of reading for pleasure, supported by their parents at home.”

The school is part of the Tauheedul Education Trust and currently has pupils in years one and two.

Phonics is widely used but came under fire from school leaders when it was hailed by the Government as the only preferred learning tool.

The screening check is 
an assessment of pupils’ 
phonics skills at the end of Year One.