Overnight news digest - Farage predicts 'seismic shock' at next general election and British Medical journey says no evidence for Vitamin D supplements

Farage predicts 'seismic shock' at next general election
Farage predicts 'seismic shock' at next general election
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Catch up with all the latest overnight news with our morning roundup

EXPERTS TO DELIVER MINI-BUDGET VERDICT AMID TORY INFIGHTING OVER BREXIT COSTS

Independent experts will deliver their verdict on the mini-Budget amid a backlash by senior Tories over damning assessments about the impact of Brexit on the economy.

Philip Hammond confirmed he was abandoning plans to achieve a budget surplus by the end of the decade after revealing the country is set to take a hit of almost £60 billion over the coming five years as a result of the referendum vote to leave the European Union.

The Chancellor set out how the Office for Budget Responsibility had slashed growth forecasts and predicted higher than previously expected borrowing.

FARAGE PREDICTS 'SEISMIC SHOCK' AT NEXT GENERAL ELECTION

Nigel Farage has predicted a "seismic shock" at the next general election if Theresa May has not delivered Brexit by 2020.

Mr Farage said he suspected the Conservative Government may turn out to be "not fit for the legacy of Brexit".

And he said he expected a "realignment" of politics which could involve old parties disappearing and being replaced with new ones reflecting the new public mood.

MORE ALLEGED VICTIMS COME FORWARD OVER 'SEX ABUSE' IN FOOTBALL

Eleven people have come forward to police in the wake of revelations about sexual abuse in football.

Former footballers David White, Paul Stewart and Andy Woodward have all revealed they were abused by football coaches as children.

Former Liverpool and Tottenham player Stewart waived his anonymity in an interview with The Daily Mirror, after ex-Sheffield United player Woodward revealed that he was abused by coach Barry Bennell at Crewe Alexandra.

POLICE URGE DATING APPS TO DO MORE TO PREVENT CRIME, AFTER STEPHEN PORT CASE

Dating apps must take greater responsibility for protecting their users' safety, police chiefs said as Scotland Yard faced allegations that it missed opportunities to stop serial killer Stephen Port.

The 41-year-old chef drugged and murdered four young men and raped several others he had lured to his flat after meeting them via web dating services.

The Metropolitan Police, who have come under fierce criticism for their handling of the case, said they were working with charities to raise awareness among users.

HEART DISEASE RISK 'CUT BY SWAPPING SATURATED FAT FOR HEALTHIER ENERGY SOURCES'

Swapping saturated fat for healthier sources of energy does cut the risk of heart disease, a large study suggests.

New research shows that replacing just 1% of daily calorie intake from saturated fat with other sources of energy - such as whole grain carbohydrates or polyunsaturated fats - cuts the risk of heart disease by 6 to 8%.

The study, published in the British Medical Journal, is the latest to throw its weight behind official NHS recommendations which say saturated fat should be limited in order to protect against heart disease.

BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL PIECE SAYS EVIDENCE DOES NOT BACK VITAMIN D SUPPLEMENTS

There is not enough evidence to support taking vitamin D supplements, according to an article in a leading medical journal.

Earlier this year, Public Health England (PHE) said vitamin D was vital for bone and muscle health but warned that people were generally not getting enough from sunlight during the winter months

It said everyone should ensure they were getting 10 micrograms of vitamin D per day, and should consider a supplement during the autumn and winter.

MARGARET THATCHER'S WELFARE STATE PLANS PROMPTED 'NEAREST THING TO CABINET RIOT'

Margaret Thatcher secretly continued to pursue politically explosive plans to dismantle the welfare state even after ministers thought they had been killed off by a Cabinet revolt, according to newly-released official files.

The proposals - drawn up by the Whitehall's think-tank the Central Policy Review Staff (CPRS) - were among the most contentious and the most radical to be considered by Mrs Thatcher's Conservative government during her 11 years in office.

They included scrapping free universal healthcare and requiring people to take out private insurance, charging for education, and ending the annual uprating of benefits in line with inflation, as well as sweeping defence cuts.

ONLINE SCAMS COST CHRISTMAS SHOPPERS MORE THAN £10M LAST YEAR

Christmas shoppers were fleeced of more than £10 million in online scams last year, police have revealed as they warned the festive period is "prime time" for fraudsters.

As huge numbers of bargain hunters prepare to log on on Black Friday tomorrow, officers highlighted the growing trend for criminals to use social media to target potential victims with apparently attractive deals.

Figures show that last year victims reported losing more than £10 million to fraudsters when shopping online for Christmas presents.

BLETCHLEY PARK TO BE SITE OF NATIONAL COLLEGE OF CYBER SECURITY

Bletchley Park, the home of Second World War codebreakers, is to become the site of the UK's first National College of Cyber Security.

It was at the site that Alan Turing and his team of computer scientists and codebreakers unravelled the Enigma coding system used by the Nazis during the Second World War, an achievement it has been claimed significantly shortened the war and saved millions of lives in the process.

Now a new cyber security body called QUFARO@Bletchley Park, which includes experts from the National Museum of Computing and BT Security, has announced plans to create a college for 16 to 19-year-olds to learn key cyber security skills.

PARENTS URGED TO STOP PRETENDING FATHER CHRISTMAS IS REAL

Parents have been urged to stop pretending Father Christmas is real in case the "lie" damages relations with their children.

Spinning stories about Santa risks undermining a child's trust and is morally suspect, according to two experts.

Psychologist Professor Christopher Boyle and social scientist Dr Kathy McKay also condemn the idea of a "terrifying" North Pole intelligence agency which judges children to be nice or naughty.