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Mayhem at Take That concerts

Latest news from the Lancashire Evening Post

Latest news from the Lancashire Evening Post

The full extent of the mayhem at 2011’s Take That concerts can be revealed.

Over eight boozy summer nights at the City of Manchester Stadium paramedics had to deal with an astonishing 792 medical cases.

The majority were for drink and heat-related issues as huge crowds of women from across the country flocked to City’s ground to see the boyband.

At the time it was reported more than 100 women had to be admitted to A & E because they got so drunk at the sold-out gigs.

But the shocking extent of the chaos can now be reported following data obtained under Freedom of Information laws.

It can be revealed that:

Of the 792 people treated, 31 had to be taken to hospital from the ground

Police dealt with 75 incidents and made 30 arrests

One fan was assaulted and suffered a fit on the pitch

A large-scale police operation was mounted after a ‘hand’ was spotted in the canal which turned out to be a glove

The details come from a meeting of the Safety Advisory Group which is made up of club, police, health and council officials.

Within it police say that they had to deal with ‘very difficult circumstances’.

It also reveals that a gas leak on a Monday night sandwiched between the eight dates would have caused a concert to be cancelled had it happened on a day when one was due to take place.

The data says the one assaulted fan was released from hospital and refused to press charges against those arrested.

The document adds that the report of a ‘hand’ in the canal caused ‘significant investigations’ by GMP.

Such was the fear of booze-fuelled issues police restricted sales of alcohol at nearby outlets and off-licences.

Following the last gig, in June, one steward claimed some women behaved worse than football fans. A total of 65 women and 35 men were thrown out for being too drunk.

The steward added that many women were slumped in their seats, unable to walk.

 

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