Readers’ letters - February 25

Carts, such as this one, were once used to sell milk  but the times are changing says a reader. This picture is believed to depict Pickerings Farm which stood on the corner of Todd Lane North and Brownedge Road. 					                               Picture courtesy of Preston Digital Archive
Carts, such as this one, were once used to sell milk  but the times are changing says a reader. This picture is believed to depict Pickerings Farm which stood on the corner of Todd Lane North and Brownedge Road. Picture courtesy of Preston Digital Archive
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From local shops to drones – the times they are a changing

In times past, I remember bread was delivered to shops by horse and van, coal by horse and cart.

Traders used hand carts to sell fish, fruit and buttermilk in the streets.

There were small shops.

No technology in those days.

The shopkeeper would say “how are you today, Mrs Jones?” or use first names and have a conversation laced with family topics.

Today in supermarkets, assistants talk kindly to 
you, “can I help pack your bags?” but they have limited time.

We avoid being checked out by machines.

Our identity is affected by the buildings around 
us.

At the end of our road, small shops at the corners keep changing.

I have also noticed, over the years, many of the 
small shops on the main road have closed. Luckily we still have some small shops left and a couple of large stores.

Today there are many estate agents popping up around us which are needed to service the people on the move.

The provision, location and accessibility of shopping facilities are aspects of the environment which contributes to an individual’s feeling of well being and sense of community.

We have lost large stores like BHS and Woolworths – and many more could 
go.

In the future, will we be sat at the computer ordering our food and goods online, with some being delivered by drones?

We seem to be moving in that direction.

How times have changed.

P O’Connor

Address supplied

Reject bland soundbites

I took a day’s holiday from work to spend a few hours at the Preston New Road fracking site with the men and women who have been protesting since work began in early January.

Yes, I had many other things I could have been doing with my day off but so do they. Many have put their lives on hold and risked all in the hope that someone will listen to their concerns.

The support from passing motorists was overwhelming.

Clearly, we cannot all put our lives on hold to stand at the side of the road but we can all do more. The easiest action any of us can take is to reject the bland promises and soundbites peddled by politicians and industry representatives. Ask questions and demand answers.

Whether for or against fracking, we all have a decision to make about the world we want to leave for our children.

So, when you honk your horn or wave your support to a roadside protestor, please be reminded that time for asking your questions is short and the time to regret is long.

I would just like to add one last point for those motorists who shout abuse or feel the need to make rude hand gestures at grandparents, mums, dads and children. The protestors standing on the roadside are just people trying to be heard.

Duncan Coppersthwaite

Kirkham

Open All Hours – shut shop

Re: the letter (LP, February 9) inviting readers to lobby the BBC via a petition to commission another series of Still Open All Hours. What on earth for? It’s one of the most disappointing sitcoms ever screened. Trying to emulate the perfection of its original with the brilliant Ronnie Barker adds up to sacrilege.

David Jason was great as Granville, but he’s a pale imitation of Ronnie Barker in the character the series was built round. Now the new set-up relies on outdoor slapstick.

Sorry, but it’s time for the closing down poster on Arkwright’s window.

Neil Kendall

Via email