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Worden Park’s historic garden in restoration work

Restoration: Volunteers Catherine Robinson, Angela Hodgson and Gillian Robinson at the Apple Tree Planting at Worden Park, Leyland

Restoration: Volunteers Catherine Robinson, Angela Hodgson and Gillian Robinson at the Apple Tree Planting at Worden Park, Leyland

A historic walled garden has planted new roots as part of a £100,000 restoration project to open it up to the community.

Apple trees have been planted at Worden Park’s 18th century garden, including a variety called Jenny Lind, thought to have been raised in the Leyland area around 200 years ago.

The ceremony was part of a plan to restore the walled garden to its former glory and create a new community resource, where people with learning difficulties can learn horticultural skills. The potting sheds will display local crafts and people of all ages will be able to undertake volunteering and learning opportunities.

Some of the work is being done by organisations such as Community Payback, Runshaw College, Myerscough College and The Prince’s Trust, providing skills training for disadvantaged or unemployed local young people.

The Brothers of Charity Services are leading the project, with funding and support from South Ribble Partnership, South Ribble Borough Council and Veolia Environmental Trust.

The apple trees were donated by Phil Rainford of the South Ribble Orchard Project and June Cox, who grafted some traditional varieties to donate.

Ann Jones, Brothers of Charity Services manager, said: “The help from volunteers and community groups has been fantastic and we’re extremely appreciative. The project is on schedule to be complete by summer when it will be open to the visiting public seven days a week.”

Veolia Trust director McNabb Laurie added: “This will be a living garden that will grow and develop over the years.”

 

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