We’re not potty – this is also part of the national education curriculum

Angela Andrews at The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole
Angela Andrews at The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole
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Sarah Fielden talks to the mother and daughter team behind a Little Hoole craft venture.

Family business The Crafty Potter first opened its doors in July last year.

Margaret Noblet at The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole

Margaret Noblet at The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole

Mother-and-daughter team Margaret and Angela began the Little Hoole studio after deciding to take on a new venture.

And the popular shop is going from strength to strength, with the help of the close-knit family.

The Crafty Potter offers craft activities including clay modelling, potters’ wheels, pottery painting and make a bear,

Partner Angela Andrews described the new venture as a “big learning curve”.

The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole

The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole

She said: “I love it. It’s been hard work but I love the customers we get in and it’s a very cheery place to work.

“Although it’s been hard work, I’ve enjoyed every minute of it and enjoyed the challenge.”

Angela, 47, said she was grateful to all the help from her family, including her 
sister Michelle who helped voluntarily and gave guidance on sales and marketing.

She said: “Up to now, the main stay of our business has been parties and groups.

The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole

The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole

“We run hen parties, baby showers, corporate team building and potters’ wheel events.

“We are particularly keen to support community groups and charities and regularly run painting sessions for residential homes, special needs groups, scouts, cubs, brownies and guides.”

Angela said that, after working with local schools, the business has now started to run pottery activities designed to be both educational and fun.

After consultation with teachers and education specialists, a new initiative called Pots of History has been designed around the national curriculum, and children can design and paint a custom made amphora in line with history topics.

Angela Andrews and Michelle Hulme at The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole

Angela Andrews and Michelle Hulme at The Crafty Potter, Little Hoole

Margaret Noblet, 76, set up The Crafty Potter with her daughter and said: “I always wanted to do something in the way of having a family business where everybody could lend a hand.

“I’ve got nine children and each one of them has an expertise, and Angela and I decided we wanted to go into something crafty.

“We both enjoy working with children – Angela runs a charity with disabled children – and we wanted to combine something with interest to them and us.”

Two of Margaret’s sons work in computing and have been able to offer advice, and one of her daughters chose the name of the shop.

She said: “It’s really turned into a family thing.

“It’s fantastic being with children.

“I love children and it’s the whole atmosphere – I love meeting people. It’s been an absolute Godsend for me since my husband died 
nearly four years ago – it gives me a reason to get up in the morning and a reason to work.”

She added: “It’s wonderful.”