Surgeon claims bypass will carve up a rural landscape

TRANQUIL: Proposed route of the bypass between D'Urton Lane and Broughton Church
TRANQUIL: Proposed route of the bypass between D'Urton Lane and Broughton Church
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A consultant surgeon has claimed a new road would leave a scar on the idyllic rural landscape in front of his country mansion.

Urologist Ahsanul Haq told a public inquiry in Preston the proposed route of the Broughton Bypass would carve an unsightly gash across the rolling farmland surrounding his family home Brooklands in D’Urton Lane.

“When we first saw the house we fell in love with it,” said the Royal Preston Hospital specialist.

“We thought it was the idyllic place for our children to live.

“It has lovely grounds and fantastic open views of the countryside.

“It is our house for life.”

But the inquiry heard Mr Haq and his wife Nasra were now having to come to terms with their perfect view being destroyed by the arrival of a £24m road to relieve congestion in nearby Broughton village.

The couple claimed the bypass would have a detrimental effect on their lives through traffic noise, loss of privacy and visual impact.

“Our youngest child has a viewing area from where she watches the horses in the field below,” said Mr Haq.

“But having a roundabout where animals used to stroll isn’t quite the same.”

The inquiry heard Lancashire County Council had included extensive screening work in the scheme to lessen the impact of the road on neighbouring properties.

Mr Haq said: “The council have done a great deal to mitigate the noise and the visual impact as far as the school and the church opposite are concerned.

“But we live in our house 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and it is disappointing that people from the council have not even come to look at the effect it will have on us.”

Mrs Haq added: “This is a house we bought forever, our forever house. And we have no intention of leaving it.

“It is idyllic. It is a grand old house which needed a lot of loving care.

“We have worked tirelessly on restoring it and making it beautiful.

“While we understand the bypass is necessary, we feel we have been completely overlooked – in essence bypassed.

“Everything we bought the house for will be stripped away.”

Government inspector Diane Lewis is to make a site visit on Tuesday.