Hike in commuting costs leads to flexible working

TRAFFIC: Commuting can be both time consuming and expensive
TRAFFIC: Commuting can be both time consuming and expensive
Share this article
0
Have your say

Commuting costs for Preston workers are continuing to spiral upwards, new figures show.

A recent survey has shown that a third of Preston workers now spend five per cent of their salary on commuting costs.

Businesses that want to retain and attract top talent cannot fail to address the issue of the costly commute.

Richard Morris

The world’s largest workplace provider Regus polled 4,000 senior business people across the UK and the results show that workers who travel to work in Preston by bus, train or car are facing increasing commuting costs due to the rising cost of fuel and train fares.

Commuting costs are believed to contributing to a rise in the number of UK professionals looking to work flexibly or work from home.

Business centres offer a professional, convenient alternative for those looking to avoid long, expensive, and sometimes difficult, journeys into the office.

And Richard Morris, UK CEO of Regus, urged businesses to provide flexible working solutions to relieve some of the cost burden off staff.

He said: “Businesses that want to retain and attract top talent cannot fail to address the issue of the costly commute.

“Flexible working can provide a solution. By offering their employees the opportunity to work closer to home at least some of the time, our customers have not only improved staff loyalty but also seen an impact on productivity.”

Preston is 1 per cent above the national average as according to the UK wide survey, the average proportion of pay spent on commuting by UK workers is now 4 per cent, a rise from 3 per cent in 2010.

For nearly a quarter, 23 per cent, of respondents the daily commute costs over a tenth of their monthly pay packet.

And Mr Morris believes that by helping limit staff commuting problems businesses can increase productivity.

He said: “Staff that spend less time stuck in traffic jams or on crowded trains have more time to apply themselves to the job in hand.”

Rail fares nationally have risen around 20 per cent since 2010, and annual season tickets cost between £2,000 and £5,000, depending on the route.