Preston in new guide to ‘great stuff’ in the north

Photo Neil Cross
Lancashire Encounter in Preston city centre
Chinese Dragon
Photo Neil Cross Lancashire Encounter in Preston city centre Chinese Dragon
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Three of Preston’s most popular art organisations have been named within a guide celebrating “great stuff” in the north of England.

The Harris, the Birley Artist Studios and UCLan-based In Certain Places have been chosen from candidates across the area to be part of the new guide.

Film still from Time by Nathaniel Mellors, set in Preston Bus Station

Film still from Time by Nathaniel Mellors, set in Preston Bus Station

Every year, the Hannah Directory draws together 50 people and organisations from fields including arts, business and science, from across the north.

The three Preston-based organisations have been chosen in recognition of their achievements in the city centre over the last year.

They include the People’s Canopy by In Certain Places, which formed the centrepiece for last year’s Lancashire Encounter, an award-winning film by Nathaniel Mellors set in Preston Bus Station and commissioned by the Harris, and artist-led exhibitions and events at the Birley studios.

Andrew Wilson, who co-ordinates the Hannah Directory, said: “These three organisations make a very valuable contribution to arts and culture in Preston and the wider North West region, and I hope by sharing it as part of Hannah Directory it will inspire other people to make even more great stuff happen in places across England’s north.”

Coun Peter Kelly, cabinet member for culture and leisure at Preston Council, said, “The inclusion of three innovative cultural organisations from Preston in the directory illustrates the fantastic work that is being done in the city by many different people to deliver an exciting cultural offer for our residents and visitors.”

Elaine Speight, curator of In Certain Places, said: “We are very proud to be part of this year’s directory.”

Hannah Directory is in its fourth year, and is named after Hannah Mitchell, a suffragette and rebel who tried to create “beauty in civic life”.