Post readers give huge lift to travel-weary Harry, 90

Photo Neil Cross'Harry Butterworth, 90, of Lostock Hall, faces a four hour, six bus round  trip to St Annes to visit his wife Dorothy
Photo Neil Cross'Harry Butterworth, 90, of Lostock Hall, faces a four hour, six bus round trip to St Annes to visit his wife Dorothy
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A 90-year-old who was struggling to cope after his wife was forced out of her nursing home, has been overwhelmed with offers of support from Evening Post readers.

Harry Butterworth was left facing a 60-mile round trip every day to see wife Dorothy, 88, after Cuerden Grange Nursing Home in Bamber Bridge closed down.

The only homes in Lancashire suitable for the dementia patient were in Ormskirk, Blackburn and St Anne’s and Harry chose St Annes, though it meant catching three buses there and back.

He struggled to make the journey for a week, saying: “The strain on me was terrible. To do that journey regularly when you’re as old as me isn’t funny and it’s pretty obvious I was not going to be able to keep going regularly.”

Since the Evening Post took up the story, Harry’s wife Dorothy has been moved to Longton Nursing Home.

The retired service manager of Fir Trees Avenue, Lostock Hall, said: “Since it went online, it’s gone viral.

“I’ve had a lot of people contacting me, offering me a lift, and my niece is compiling a list.

“Everyone’s saying they’re not very happy with the system.

“The LEP has done well with this one.”

Even though Longton is much closer to Harry’s home, the location still causes problems because he can’t drive due to glaucoma and has no children to help with lifts.

He said: “If I’m not getting a lift I still have to get two buses to reach Longton, but it’s 20 minutes rather than an hour to St Anne’s.

“It’s such a big difference, and I’m really pleased with Longton Nursing Home.

“Dorothy seemed to settle in right away.”

Dorothy, a former shop worker, is one of 33 victims forced out of Cuerden Grange Nursing Home after owners decided to close down the operation last month.

It came after inspectors from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) found serious problems with the £742 a week facility.

No details have yet been made available for legal reasons, but owners say any issues relate to their inability to recruit suitable nurses and were unwilling to continue while facing ongoing difficulties.