Serving up political love match a faulty game

1995 library filer of Chris Moncrieff. Photo by Peter Smith/PA

1995 library filer of Chris Moncrieff. Photo by Peter Smith/PA

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The Tories have always sniffily rejected the view that, if you are rich enough, you can buy access to the Prime Minister.

Well, you can now stand that theory on its head.

Because David Cameron is now offering himself up for sale as a tennis partner to whoever has the cash to pay for this “honour”. The money raised from this demeaning exercise will be poured into the Conservative Party coffers.

Is this one of the bright ideas dreamed up by the Australian political guru and election-winning adviser Lynton Crosby (who is thought to be behind the recent bizarre 
catwalk ministerial reshuffle).

Well, it is a very bad idea indeed, especially since the sort of people who might have the kind of wherewithal demanded are likely to be Russian oligarchs, who are in bad enough odour already. Nor do I think ‘prostitution’ of the office of Prime Minister is too strong a word to use.

Perhaps he should think again.

l What possible useful purpose can be served by stuffing the House of Lords with deadbeat political failures? Yet it is reported that the already overcrowded Chamber – it has 800 members – is to be augmented still more, by including eight former Liberal Democrat MEPs who were booted out of the European Parliament last May.

It makes a mockery of any political system – and what is more, is an insult to the voters – to “reward” these losers with places in the 
Upper Chamber.

There can be few other occupations (though banking is probably one of them) where dismissal through incompetence and general uselessness leads to financial 
rewards and status upgrading.

If these people had served any useful purpose in Brussels, then they would have been re-elected. Instead, they are dumped, undeservedly, on the House of Lords.

It is hard to believe.

l Ed Miliband says what he patronisingly calls “members of the public” should be allowed to 
question the Prime Minister in the Palace of Westminster.

All very democratic, I am sure.

But what in reality would happen? You would simply get all the political anoraks and nerds around the place, queuing up to ask their questions. These would all be people who have political aspirations, who have tried and failed to get into Parliament and who want to achieve celebrity status in the headlines, if only for a single day.