Sexuality affects way people are treated by doctors in Lancashire, report finds

Gill Brown, chief executive of Healthwatch Lancashire

Gill Brown, chief executive of Healthwatch Lancashire

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One in four lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender men and women in Lancashire think that their sexual orientation affects the way they are treated by healthcare professionals, according to a report published by Healthwatch Lancashire.

Research conducted by Lancashire LGBT, which assessed the barriers which 116 members of the LGBT community in Lancashire experience when accessing routine healthcare, has been published in the report which is available on the Healthwatch Lancashire website.

Healthwatch Lancashire has presented the report to Lead Clinicians within the clinical commissioning groups in Lancashire and will continue to share the results of the study with health and social care professionals.

Gill Brown, Healthwatch Lancashire Chief Executive, said: “Healthwatch Lancashire has an important role of representing all people in Lancashire, including the LGB and T community.”

“There is concerning evidence from the study and it is important that these views are listened to and action is taken to ensure lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender men and women receive the quality of care they deserve.’

Dr Lewis Turner, project manager at Lancashire LGBT said: “Our research demonstrates that much work still needs to be done in reducing the barriers that LGB&T people experience when accessing routine healthcare – and this work is key to reducing health inequalities.”

“Participants have demonstrated that there are some instances of good, inclusive service provision in the county but overall, many healthcare professionals have a lack of knowledge of the needs of LGB people – and in particular, trans and gender variant people.”

Healthwatch Lancashire is the public voice on health and social care with the role to listen to views and opinions from all residents in Lancashire and to influence change.