A Helping Hand for youngsters with mental health issues

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Leyland Trucks’ Helping Hand charity donated £1,300 to the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) run by Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust to buy needed resources, toys and books.

Working with MedEquip4Kids, the children’s charity which works to provide equipment and facilities in hospitals, Helping Hand provided the donation to support the Leyland CAMHS project that provides support and treatment for vulnerable children and young people.

Tracey Hartley-Smith, team leader for the Learning Disability and Complex Needs Team at Leyland CAMHS, said: “We are absolutely elated and grateful for the donation which will go a long way in enhancing the work we do with children and young people.

“We are a team of highly skilled and experienced specialist nurses and practitioners but with a very limited budget for resources.

“Ordinarily, we couldn’t afford this equipment.

“The resources and equipment are colourful, exciting and engaging. Using such visual tools will hold the attention of children, have much greater appeal, and therefore improve the outcomes for families through the work that we do.”

Neale Handley, chairman of Helping Hand, said: “Enabling the Leyland CAMHS unit to benefit from resources which would not otherwise be available will help improve the mental health and wellbeing of so many in our community and we are delighted to be able to help.”

Ghazala Baig from MedEquip4Kids said: “We are very grateful to the Leyland Trucks Helping Hand committee and employees of Leyland Trucks for their generous donation. The work we do ensures children have better access to services and tools that will greatly enhance their quality of life, so every donation we receive makes a significant difference.”

The resources include a range of evidence based books which can support individual work with children and young people with regard to understanding emotions, worries and feelings, understand behaviour and manging behaviour and learning more about being on the autistic 
spectrum.