GONE TO POT: Refusal to fill potholes branded ‘absolutely crazy’ by councillor

Mythop road weeton
Mythop road weeton
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A councillor has branded County Hall ‘absolutely crazy’ over refusals to fill in road potholes less than two inches deep.

Weeton councillor John Singleton said the ‘terrible’ road conditions in his ward were routinely ignored by the county council because the holes did not meet the required depth for action to be taken.

The official pothole as defined by Lancashire County Council is any hole in the road surface which is at least 40mm, or nearly two inches in depth.

Councillor John Singleton

He said: “The surface on our roads are a disgrace. The official pothole as defined by Lancashire County Council is any hole in the road surface which is at least 40mm, or nearly two inches in depth.

“If a pothole is not of this size the county highways will refuse to repair it, despite the fact the hole may be next to a qualifying pothole. It’s a disgrace not only in this area but also in other areas across Fylde as well. It’s a constant battle trying to get it sorted out.”

Coun Singleton has now written to Department for Communities and Local Government minister Greg Clarke in a bid to have responsibility for road repairs handed over to local councils.

He said: “I want the Parish and Town Councils to be given the manpower and materials to perform the repairs themselves. I understand there are funding issues but in my opinion no matter how big a pothole is it should have some asphalt put on it for safety reasons.

“Chain Lane in Staining and Back Lane in Weeton must have at least 50 potholes between them. They may not all be two inches deep but it’s still a fair size to run your car over.

“Even if a small pothole is next to one that’s two inches deep it will not get filled when the workmen come out.

“It seems like common sense has gone down the pothole.”

But Lancashire County Council defended its policy on focusing on more severe potholes.

A spokesman said: “We take a long-term strategic approach to maintaining our roads which makes the best use of every pound we spend and relies on using survey data to carry out the right treatment at the right time. The aim of this is to improve the overall standard of our roads over the next 15 years, and has already lead to less damage being found on roads in the past year compared with the previous year.

“Lancashire was singled out for praise, and received an extra £4.9m from the Department for Transport to spend on road maintenance, for taking this preventative approach.

“Our priority is to ensure roads are in a condition which allows people to travel safely and efficiently. They may not look their best during the winter when the most damage is caused by wet weather and frosts.

“However, we assess the network as we approach the spring with a view to carrying out timely and effective maintenance where most needed to improve them.”