Get involved with Lancashire’s special food charter

Tea power: Preston mayor Nick Pomfret and his wife Barbara at the Sustainable Food launch
Tea power: Preston mayor Nick Pomfret and his wife Barbara at the Sustainable Food launch
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  • Charter to support the movement of sustainable food in Lancashire launched
  • Goal to tackle food waste, food poverty, obesity and diet-related ill-health
  • Find our more at www.sustainablefoodlancashire.org.uk
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A charter to support the movement for sustainable food in Lancashire was launched on Friday at a special event in Preston.

Stemming from an idea to set up a network of food related business, tackling a number of issues, such as food waste, food poverty, obesity and diet-related ill-health, founder of the The Sustainable Food Lancashire group, Kay Johnson, said she hopes more business across Lancashire will get involved.

Over 300 people got involved in every aspect related to food from caterers, farmers, public health, food banks and food waste.

Kay Johnson

“The charter is really just a set of goals that we can work toward,” she said.

“We have access to some of the best food in the country right on our doorstep but people are still going to big chain supermarkets to shop.”

Welcoming the audience to the event at St John’s Minster, Preston, Mayor Nick Pomfret said: “The Sustainable Food charter is all about local produce and celebrating the great work already being done in the community.

“This network allows people to get involved and it’s really exciting that this is happening in Preston – the heart of Lancashire.”

The charter has six priority themes: promoting healthier and sustainable food to the public; tackling food poverty and increasing access to affordable healthier food; building community food knowledge, skills resources and projects; promoting a vibrant and diverse sustainable food economy; transforming catering and food procurement and reducing waste and the ecological footprint of the food system.

And it doesn’t have to be a big change as individuals are asked to consider small things such as buying local produce.

“After we set up the group, we worked with different partners in different locations across the count to see what people wanted to see in the food charter,” said Kay.

“Over 300 people got involved in every aspect related to food from caterers, farmers, public health, food banks and food waste.”

There are now seven area networks across Lancashire who each have their own part on the charter’s website for food lovers to get involved.

Visit www.sustainablefoodlancashire.org.uk