Freak storm caused flash flooding in Morecambe and Lancaster

An exposed grid on Meldon Road in Heysham during flash floods on Wednesday night. Photo by J-Packham Photography.
An exposed grid on Meldon Road in Heysham during flash floods on Wednesday night. Photo by J-Packham Photography.
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A freak storm that hit Morecambe and Lancaster causing flash flooding was a one in almost 500 year event.

Rainfall data from Wednesday night obtained by United Utilities shows that the area was hit by a storm of intensity classed as 1 in 480 years.

Lower Church Street during flash flooding in Lancaster city centre on Wednesday evening. Photo shared by Go Burrito.

Lower Church Street during flash flooding in Lancaster city centre on Wednesday evening. Photo shared by Go Burrito.

There was flash flooding in some parts of Morecambe and many parts of Lancaster city centre, Bowerham, the Marsh, Ryelands, also near the Canal Turn at Carnforth after the violent storm hit following days of high temperatures.

The bad weather was at its worst between 5.30pm and 6.30pm.There were reports of flooded roads and loose manhole covers on Caton Road, Torrisholme Road, Park Street and Moor Lane.

Lancaster Area Police posted reported surface water and raised manholes due to the rain.

Lancaster City Council said its systems were down due to the flood.They were back up and running by Thursday morning.

The Dukes, Lancaster cancelled Wednesday night’s performance of Treasure Island at Williamson Park due to lightning strikes and flash flooding. A spokesman for United Utilities said: “Rainfall data from Wednesday night shows that Lancaster was hit by a storm of intensity classed as 1 in 480 years.

“Highway drains and sewers would have been temporarily overwhelmed by the sheer intensity of the rainfall. “

A spokesman for Lancashire County Council said: “Flooding to the road was due to drainage systems not being designed to cope with the volume of rainfall which happened within such a short period. There are a number of places where roads and gullies have been damaged which we’ve made safe and are now assessing to see what repairs will be needed.”

Coun Eileen Blamire, leader of Lancaster City Council, said: “Unfortunately these types of events are hard to predict and are devastating for those affected. The council will be investigating to see if anything more can be done to prevent similar incidents in the future.”