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Feisty females in the battle against cancer

Picture shows L to R Vicky Johnston-Right, Lisa Dentith, Amy Ashcroft, Emma Grandison, Jennifer Bragg, Ruth Robinson and Caitlin Robinson aged 9 mile who are taking part in a Race for Life challenge in June
Pictures by Paul Currie
07796 146931
www.paulcurriephotos.com

Picture shows L to R Vicky Johnston-Right, Lisa Dentith, Amy Ashcroft, Emma Grandison, Jennifer Bragg, Ruth Robinson and Caitlin Robinson aged 9 mile who are taking part in a Race for Life challenge in June Pictures by Paul Currie 07796 146931 www.paulcurriephotos.com

The friends of a new mum battling terminal cancer will be joining the fight against cancer when they pull on their running trainers this summer.

The group are taking part in Preston’s Race for Life event in honour of brave Emma Grandison.

Emma, 31, from Longton, near Preston, was just 16 weeks pregnant with her first child when she found out the devastated news that she had bowel cancer and secondary cancer on her liver

Since finding out Emma married Ian and their daughter Erin was born, 15 weeks early.

Mum and baby are currently doing well and Emma is determined to fight the disease.

Emma’s positive attitude has inspired many people and she has already received support from all corners of the globe, in particular from her loving family and friends.

Cancer Research UK is hosting the Race for Life in Preston and Emma’s sister-in-law Ruth Robinson has rallied together a gang of friends and family members to take part in tribute to Emma’s courage and ongoing fight.

Ruth, 38, lost her own father to lung cancer when she was pregnant with her second child in 2007.

Mum-of-three Ruth, who is married to Emma’s brother James, said: “It was such a terrible shock when we found out about Emma. Particularly as her prognosis was so poor at the beginning.

“But she is such an inspiration and has always been a very influential and vibrant woman, a force of nature, who is fighting this with all her might.

“She is now on a combination of treatment aimed at prolonging her life way beyond her initial prognosis and even now she is looking so much better and is so hopeful about the future, as new cancer treatments are developing all the time.

“Emma is aiming to come along. There will be so much support for her there. I’m sure it will be a very emotional day for us all.”

In January friends, family and colleagues of Emma’s took part in Cancer Research UK’s Dryathlon and raised a staggering £12,000 for the charity.

Ruth is also planning to take part in the Blackpool Race for Life with her eldest daughter Caitlin.

She added: “I initially took part in Race for Life after my dad died, but with Emma’s diagnosis last year, Caitlin said she really wanted to join me this year. I think she understands now how cancer can really affect families. We both want to do our bit to help fund research into treatments that are saving the lives of cancer patients on a daily basis.”

Ruth also gives up her free time for Cancer Research UK by cheerleading at the Greater Manchester Marathon and will be marshalling at this year’s Aintree Race for Life.

Emma said: “It’s the immense support from my friends and family that gives me a boost.

“My friends doing this in my name for such a good charity is a win win situation.”

Although the number of people being diagnosed with cancer is going up – largely due to the fact that people are living longer and cancer is predominantly a disease of old age – the good news is that, thanks to research, survival rates have doubled in the past 40 years.

More people across the North West are now beating the disease than ever before.

Research has led to an improved understanding of the biology and causes of cancer. This in turn has led to discovering better ways to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease, all helping to save lives.

Some of the landmark advances in treatment include tamoxifen for breast cancer and cisplatin for testicular cancer, developments which both involved Cancer Research UK researchers playing a key role.

Maria Montgomery, Cancer Research UK’s Preston Events Manager, said: “We’re calling on an army of feisty females to help us stop cancer in its tracks.

“Race for Life events are not competitive.

“They are not about being fit or fast. Instead, they are an amazing way to celebrate life but also remember those who have been lost to the disease.”

“Participants may be walking or running but what’s inescapable is the power and strength that comes from thousands of women joining together to confront cancer.”

Race for Life in Preston is a 5k route and takes place at Moor Park on Sunday June 15

To enter Race for Life events in the North West, visit www.raceforlife.org or call 0845 600 6050.

The entry fee is £14.99 for adults and £10 for girls under 16. This covers the costs of staging the event series and means that money raised in sponsorship can go to help beat cancer.

If you are taking part in this year’s Race for Life in Preston contact Laura Wild on laura.wild@lep.co.uk or 01772 838167

 

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