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Pollution from fracking ‘is unlikely’

plans: Shale gas extraction is set for the county

plans: Shale gas extraction is set for the county

It is “extremely unlikely” that ground water supplies would be polluted by methane as a result of controversial “fracking” for shale gas, UK geologists said today.

And although the process, which uses high-pressure liquid pumped deep underground to fracture shale rock and release gas, caused two earthquakes in Lancashire last year, they were too small to cause damage, they said.

Campaigners have called for a moratorium on fracking in the UK in the face of the earthquakes and amid fears it could lead to pollution of drinking water by methane gas or chemicals in the liquid used in the process.

Fracking has proved controversial in the US, where shale gas is already being exploited on a large scale and where footage has been captured of people able to set fire to the water coming out of their taps as a result of gas contamination.

But Professor Mike Stephenson, of the British Geological Survey, said most geologists thought it was a “pretty safe activity” and the risks associated with it were low. He said the distance between groundwater supplies around 40-50 metres below the surface and the deep sources of gas in the shale a mile or two underground, made it unlikely methane would leak into water as a result of fracking.

“Most geologists are pretty convinced that it is extremely unlikely contamination would occur,” he said.

There was no evidence in peer-reviewed literature of pollution of water by methane as a result of fracking, he said.

He also added that the presence of the gas in US water supplies was likely to be natural.

But a survey was currently being conducted in the UK, to establish a baseline of any gas naturally found in groundwater before drilling took place.

 

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