Emergency Poet’s got the right tonic

0
Have your say

When it comes to dishing out medicine Deborah Alma definitely has the right prescription.

Known as the Emergency Poet, she uses her literary prowess to dispense some TLC to people from all walks of life from a waiting room made out of a converted retro ambulance.

The Emergency Poet Deborah Alma at Edge Hill University in Ormskirk during National Poetry Day

The Emergency Poet Deborah Alma at Edge Hill University in Ormskirk during National Poetry Day

Deborah, who offers consultations inside her ambulance and prescribes poems as cures has been dispensing poetic pills to staff and students at Edge Hill University.

Following the visit Preston North End fans are hoping that she can cure their current ill fortunes and put them back on track to success.

Digging deep inside her Cold Comfort Pharmacy, she found a few words of wisdom which could help put the Lilywhites on the road to recovery.

Deborah is billed the world’s first and only mobile poetic first aid service and was invited to the Ormskirk university to mark National Poetry Day yesterday.

During my work as the Emergency Poet, by far the most common ailment ‘patients’ bring to me is stress from work and the pressures of modern living

Deborah Alma

One of the institutions’s library staff, Dee McMahon, came across her and thought a campus consultation would be interactive, fun, lighthearted and something that students could really engage with.

Inside the ambulance are skulls, jars of eyeballs and other body parts inside the ambulance. She said: “I visit lots of universities around the country and I have to say, Edge Hill staff and students I’ve consulted today seem particularly content and happy with their lot.

I’ve been given cakes and coffee so I’m also happy!”

“During my work as the Emergency Poet, by far the most common ailment ‘patients’ bring to me is stress from work and the pressures of modern living. People are doing too much, too fast and not slowing down.”

“Some prescriptions are more difficult than others. Some people come to me with ‘meaning of life’ type problems I can’t put my finger on, and somebody came to me recently who was grieving for their cat.

“I’m used to writing poems for people who are grieving for humans but the cat was a new one.”