£30,000 to boost research into tumour treatment

The UCLan Brain Tumour Research Centre team with Jay Lynchenhaun (centre) and other volunteers from Inbetweenears in the research labs.

The UCLan Brain Tumour Research Centre team with Jay Lynchenhaun (centre) and other volunteers from Inbetweenears in the research labs.

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University academics have received a major cash boost to help their pioneering research into brain tumour diagnosis and treatment.

UNIVERSITY academics have received a major cash boost to help their pioneering research into brain tumour diagnosis and treatment.

Local charity Inbetweenears has handed over £30,000 to the University of Central Lancashire to help the work continue.

The charity, which was set up by Jay Lynchenhaun following his brain tumour diagnosis in 2011, has worked closely with UCLan researchers over the last few years through Brain Tumour North West; a strategic alliance between UCLan, the Neurosurgical Unit and Neuropathology Department at the Royal Preston Hospital and other universities and NHS institutions across the North West.

UCLan opened its Brain Tumour Research Centre to the public at the weekend to share some of the ground breaking research taking place and accept the donation, along with a commemorative plaque, from Jay and his mum Sharon Hacking.

Jay said the work being done by the centre was “dynamic and extremely important”.

He said: “Brain cancer research only receives 0.7% of the government’s allocation for cancer research, so this is why we have to help raise additional funding.

“More people under the age of 40 die of brain cancer than any other cancer. Something must be done.”

Over the past year the university has been credited with discovering a new way to diagnose brain cancer which promises to cut diagnosis times from two to three days to just 30 minutes using blood tests. Dr Lisa Shaw, lecturer in immunology in the School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, said: “This donation will enable us to continue our research into an area that has in the past been underfunded so we are very grateful to the charity for its continued support. We have made great strides in developing new ways to diagnose and treat brain cancer and this funding boost will hopefully take us one step further towards the ultimate goal of finding a cure.”