Crohn’s disease sufferer Vikki’s mission after life-saving operation

Vikki Sewell has been fundraising for Crohn's and Colitis UK after her own experiences
Vikki Sewell has been fundraising for Crohn's and Colitis UK after her own experiences
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The past 12 months have been a roller coaster of emotions for Vikki Sewell.

For the 25-year-old from Chorley underwent a major operation which saw her have 18 inches of her small bowel removed.

Vikki was so poorly doctors said if they hadn’t operated on her when they did in January last year she wouldn’t have survived.

She has Crohn’s disease which she was diagnosed with when she was 19, but in November 2013 she began experiencing terrible pains.

Vikki explains: “I got diagnosed when I was 19, I had a lot of problems because they kept saying it was IBS.

“I have been quite ill, but I have always managed to work full time, I have pancreatitis.

“This time last year I had had these pains for about three months, since November 2013, I was in agony. I had an MRI scan and blood tests, they found an abscess in my bowel that had been untreated. I ended up having 18 inches of my small bowel removed, I had six months off work because of an infection in the scar tissue. The surgeon told me if he hadn’t operated that night I would have died, it had gone septic. I had abdominal sepsis.”

Vikki, who works at Talk Talk at Tulketh Mill in Ashton, Preston, admits she had been down after the surgery, but was keen to turn it into something positive and set about fundraising for Crohn’s and Colitis UK. She contacted local businesses for raffle prizes and held a raffle which raised £582 for the charity.

She said: “I thought instead of being negative, because it had really got me down. I would raise money and awareness. A lot of people don’t know what it is. I wanted to do something really good.

Vikki was treated at the Royal Preston Hospital and now volunteers to help other people going through the same as her, or young people diagnosed with Crohn’s disease.

She said: “I volunteer with young people who don’t cope well with it. I’ve been round to see a few people. I just get on with it and I don’t let it affect me, I can show them to live a positive life.

“It’s really rewarding for me to, I form a relationship with them.”