Trainer sees record number of girls take up engineering

Training 2000 has enrolled it's largest group of female engineering students in it's history

Training 2000 has enrolled it's largest group of female engineering students in it's history

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Record numbers of girls are ditching traditional careers for a chance to study engineering, according to a leading Lancashire training provider.

Training 2000 has seen it’s greatest intake of female engineering students to date.

The organisation, which caters for school leavers from across Central Lancashire, including Preston and Chorley, has seen 13 girls aged 16-plus signing up for Level two and three engineering apprenticeships this September.

Only three per cent of professional construction engineers in the UK are women, which is the lowest in the EU.

Daisy Mitchell, 17, studying an engineering maintenance and operations apprenticeship said: “I have a strong interest in mechanical engineering. The UK is screaming out for engineers and the job prospects are very good.”

Training 2000’s CEO Steve Gray said: “Training 2000 is one of a number of education bodies which works hard to battle stereotypes that reduce young women’s career choices and we hope to create the female role models of the future. “However there is still progress to be made, as recent research by GirlGuiding UK has shown that 62 per cent of 11-21 year-old girls unfortunately believe STEM courses such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics are just for boys.”

By raising the accessibility of technical routes into the engineering sector, BTEC and work-based qualifications can encourage more women into these sectors.

According to researchers at the UK Commission for Employment and Skills, by 2020 almost half of women will have a higher-level academic or vocational qualification and will take two-thirds of all new highly-skilled jobs created in the next six years.

Minister for Women and Equalities Jo Swinson said: “It’s great to see so many young women turning to engineering as a profession.