Thousands of houses, new schools and a bypass among the plans for Preston’s future

"social and community exemplar" from master plan

"social and community exemplar" from master plan

  • 1,100 homes and community facilities at Cottam Hall
  • 1,300 homes and a mixed use development at Cottam Brickworks
  • 5,200 homes to be built in North West Preston
  • The North West Preston East-West Link Road
  • School sites in Whittingham, Cottam and North West Preston
  • Extra primary care facilities in central Preston, Ingol and North West Preston
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THOUSANDS of homes, major roads and new schools are among developments that have been mapped out for Preston’s future.

City leaders have agreed to adopt the Preston Local Plan, a landmark document setting out the city’s changing shape to 2026.

Three years in the making, the plan has been described as “one of the most important documents” the council will adopt, acting as a framework to guide decisions on future applications.

It earmarks and protects land for development, and will also stop new takeaways opening in the daytime within 400m of a secondary school.

Plans for Cottam Parkway Railway Station have been put on hold and not included within the blueprint for the city, with talks continuing between Network Rail and Lancashire County Council.

The Local Plan, now a legal planning document, was celebrated at the latest full council meeting.

This sets in stone how we see our city developing until 2026.

Coun Neil Cartwright

Coun John Swindells, deputy leader of Preston Council, said: “It has been a long time in the making but we are further down the track than most local authorities.

“As far as I’m aware, there are only 47 of 326 got as far as we’ve got and a lot of thanks goes to officers.”

He thanked present and past councillors for their efforts in working on the plan, which will put the city “in charge of its own destiny”.

Conservative leader Coun Neil Cartwright said: “This is probably one of the most important documents this council will adopt.

“This sets in stone how we see our city developing until 2026.”
He said there had been a “tremendous” amount of consultation on the project, and said: “It has been an absolute tour de force.

“It has been one of the most successful cross-party operations, I don’t think there have been any political disagreements in it.
“It really is an extremely important document.

“Without this, we’ve spent a small fortune on fighting 
appeals and it will save us, hopefully, a lot of money in 
rebuffing vexatious developers.”

The principle of the developments earmarked within the plan is now guaranteed in planning terms, meaning developers must meet the rules set out in those areas.

They include thousands of homes, protected land for the Broughton Bypass and the Preston Western Distributor, and extra primary care facilities.

There is also to be an extra primary school site in Whittingham, one to two primary school sites in Cottam and three to three-and-a-half primary school sites in North West Preston.

There is to be additional secondary school provision at North West Preston.

The Local Plan gives the council more authority to respond to applications, and more control to turn down schemes that are not in-keeping with the framework.

The framework also sets out both the quantity and standard of homes to be built, and protects green space in the city.

Developments earmarked within the blueprint include:

• 1,100 homes and community facilities at Cottam Hall

• 1,300 homes and a mixed use development at Cottam Brickworks

• 5,200 homes to be built in North West Preston, with 2,363 of those over the plan period. North West Preston is around Broughton, Cottam, Woodplumpton and Bartle

• The Broughton Bypass and the Preston Western Distributor, with planning permission to be refused for developments that would prejudice their development

• The North West Preston East-West Link Road

• School sites in Whittingham, Cottam and North West Preston

• Extra primary care facilities in central Preston, Ingol and North West Preston