CAMPAIGN: Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors bid to recruit more women

Louise Brooke-Smith
Louise Brooke-Smith
0
Have your say

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors is launching a campaign to attract more talent from diverse backgrounds to the profession – in particular females – to help with the growing skills shortages in the industry.

Commenting on the campaign, known as Surveying the Future, Sean Tomkins, RICS chief executive says: “Tackling the issue of diversity in a traditionally white, middle-class and male-dominated sector, which today only has 13 per cent female representation among qualified chartered surveyors, is no easy task.”

I think partly why so few women are attracted to careers in construction, infrastructure, property and land is because there are so few successful females in such roles in the public eye.

Louise Brooke-Smith - RICS president

He adds: “Any perceived barriers or obstacles preventing people – particularly women – from applying for jobs and reaching their full potential must be broken down so that we can build the diversity of skilled talent needed for the future.”

A survey of 75,000 members of RICS recently revealed that more than two out of five surveying firms were turning down new business because of the “dearth” of skilled workers.

Over the next few months, the RICS’ Surveying the Future campaign will promote both the local and international attractiveness of a profession in high demand, as well as taking a holistic look, from classroom to boardroom, at the issues which still affect the retention and recruitment of talented people, including the importance of effective leadership.

Victoria Critchley is a partner in the planning and development team at Gerald Eve, responsible for managing a number of development projects across the North West.

She said: “We are starting to see more women come in to the industry and this is encouraging, but we are still a long way off seeing an equal gender split in the profession.

“We have a healthy intake of female graduates and we encourage all our graduates to work alongside our partners.”

RICS president Louise Brooke-Smith, a chartered urban land economist and town planner, added: “I think partly why so few women are attracted to careers in construction, infrastructure, property and land is because there are so few successful females in such roles in the public eye.”