Army officer killed on dual carriageway to be honoured with full military funeral

DEVASTATING BLOW: Capt James Feeney's family have paid tribute to a 'unique, very special individual'
DEVASTATING BLOW: Capt James Feeney's family have paid tribute to a 'unique, very special individual'
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An Army officer killed walking along a dual carriageway late at night is to be given a full military funeral in Lancashire tomorrow.

Capt James Feeney, 28, described by his family as a “unique individual,”died after colliding with a van on the A2 in Kent on May 15.

His death has been devastating and shocking, but we are incredibly proud of the man he was.

Capt James Feeney

Friends believe the Afghanistan veteran was on the busy Canterbury to Dover road at around 4am trying to get back to his barracks eight miles away after losing his wallet on a night out.

Police have issued an appeal for witnesses.

Fellow soldiers from the Ist Battalion the Royal Welsh Regiment based in Folkestone will provide the bearer party to carry Capt Feeney’s coffin in and out of St Paul’s Church, Farington near Leyland (2.30pm). Troops will also deliver a gun salute.

Relatives today issued a moving tribute to the real life action man who had always wanted to join the armed forces from a young age.

“His death has left a huge unfillable hole felt by all his family,” said a statement. “He was a unique, very special individual, cramming more in his far-too-short 28 years than most people do in a lifetime.

“ His death has been devastating and shocking, but we are incredibly proud of the man he was.”

Capt Feeney was brought up in Lostock Hall from the age of two and attended the town’s infant, junior and high schools before going on to Runshaw College and then Glasgow University where he gained his Masters in history.

He was also a talented footballer, having trials with Blackpool and Glasgow Rangers and later turning out for Partick Thistle reserves.

He went to the military college Sandhurst in 2009 and passed out as a lieutenant in 2010.

He was promoted to the rank of captain in 2013 prior to a nine-month Afghan tour.

A friend said: “James was so popular, we expect hundreds to line the route.”